Bell Anthology - Three Virginia Counties

The Raymond M. Bell Anthology



Three Virginia Counties
	Crumrine tells in his Washington County history of the first proposal (p 
183) about l775 to establish 3 western counties in Virginia. This plan was never 
carried into effect.. It probably has never been published before.

	Ohio County

To begin where the division line between Maryland & Pennsylvania continued on the 
same course westward strikes the Monongahela. Thence the same course continued to 
the River Ohio. Thence up the River Ohio & along the several windings thereof to 
the Monongahela River & up the said Monongahela River to the place of beginning.

	Remarks. This would make a county of a good figure, nearly square, about 50 
miles long and 30 broad - the whole bounded by natural lines except about 30 
miles. The center of this tract of country would be near the head of Chartiers 
Creek. A rich country - thick settled and well watered with fine springs.

	Monongahela County

To begin at the lower side of the mouth of the little Kanawha. Thence southeast 
to the Laurel Hill. Thence along the Laurel Hill to where it is crossed by the 
boundary line between Maryland & Pennsylvania extended westward. Thence westward 
the same course as the said line continued to the River Ohio. Thence down the 
River Ohio to the place of beginning.

Remarks. This is nearly a square figure & contains all the. settlements on the 
Monongahela above Youghiogane County. It is about 50 miles long and nearly 40 
broad. The center of the settled part of this county is at or near the west fork 
of the Monongahela - a rich well-settled country. And as the Indiana Claim is 
contained within these lines, no other county would be involved in a dispute with 
the Proprietors.

	Youghiogane County

To begin where Ohio County does, viz, where the division line between Maryland & 
Pennsylvania continued in the same course westward strikes the Monongahela. 
Thence down the River Monongahela to the Allegany River & up the said Allegany 
River to the western boundary line of the state of Pennsylvania. Thence along the 
said western boundary line of the state of Pennsylvania to the southern boundary 
line of the said state of Pennsylvania. Thence eastward along the said southern 
boundary line of the state of Pennsylvania to the meridian of the westward 
boundary line of Maryland. Thence south to the northwest corner or boundary of 
Maryland. Thence west to the place of beginning.

And it is uncertain where the western & southern boundary lines of Pennsylvania 
will fall or be fixed, when the line of property shall be run. Suppose until then 
the said boundary should be pointed out as follows. To begin at the mouth of Plum 
Run and up the same to the head thereof. Thence to the bullock pens in tenure of 
a certain William Elliot. Thence along the great road to the widow Mires. Thence 
(crossed out) along the new Virginia Road to Stewart's Crossings. Thence along 
the same road by Guess's along the new Virginia Road - Braddock old road
(as proposed by the Honorable Convention of Virginia to the Convention of 
Pennsylvania) a temporary boundary between the two states to the boundary of 
Maryland.


Remarks. This is a very compact figure nearly the same size as the other two 
counties. The center of it would be somewhere about the mouth of Jacobs Creek in 
a fertile & populous country. By this division (there is) no inhabitant of the 3 
counties would have to cross any difficult water when obliged to attend at courts 
or other public meetings.


	Additional remark. The inhabitants settled between the Laurel Hill & the 
Allegany Mountain along Cheat River, Tygart Valley & Greenbrier are sufficient 
for a fourth county or they might remain in Augusta, or be included in 
Monongahela County by extending the first line to the Allegany Hill. Memorandum. 
Every foot of Youghiogane County as above proposed is claimed by Pennsylvania, 
and as the Monongahela is the extent of their present claim, the Proceedings in 
the courts of the undisputed parts of Virginia, would not, should this division 
be adopted, be interrupted or party quarrels arise in them.

This article was transcribed by George and Mary Ann Plance in August 1998.


Raymond M. Bell Anthology     Genealogy in Washington Co., PA

Published with permission of Raymond M. Bell.